Chai Digest: Butts deflate duck, US wants a new Pacific Island to bomb, and more

Saudi Arabia’s tourism challenge: Strict religious principles dominate discussion (Skift). I am heading there today!

Tajikistan attempts to figure out what it has to offer travelers (Skift). I only visited a corner of Tajikistan, the rugged landscape of the Marguzar Lakes left me wanting much more.

Central Asia 051

Central Asia 052

BBC’s More or Less looks at claims of massive crime activity by Romanians in the UK, listen to the 17 May 13 episode.

Why is it so much nicer to fly foreign airlines? (Seattle Times). Nothing new, but a question worth pondering. I will say, sitting in the Delta Sky Club in Tokyo-Narita, it is better than the Korean Air Lounge downstairs, so in this tiny respect Delta has something better.

The remote Pacific island that the U.S. military wants to turn into a bombing range (Skift).

Most U.S. clothing chains did not sign pact on Bangladesh factory reforms (Washington Post). The kind of headline that provokes a wearied head shake.

Cellphone Case Helps to Alleviate Wi-Fi Woes (NYT).

Extraordinary Museum Restaurants (Departures).

Mystery of the deflated Rubber Duck: were cigarette butts to blame? (SCMP).

China softens stand on Arunachal Pradesh (China National News). Can China and India ever get along? Not likely. Ditto for all of China’s neighbors.

American Samoa to Keep Flier Miles for Government Travelers (MilePoint – LarryInNYC)

North Korean Border Town Opens its Doors to Westerners (Vagabondish). Interesting option for those who do not want to do the full North Korea tour, not open to Japan, South Korea and US passport holders, though.

Does the Great Firewall Shape China’s Internet Habits? (China Digital Times). It sure is a pain in the router for me.

Delta is in no rush to buy new planes, CEO says let other airlines test them (Skift).

Rapid Travel Chai newsletter ¦ Twitter ¦ Facebook ¦ Instagram

  • Jamie

    It’s not just that foreign airlines have had better amenities for SO long. It’s also that generally they seem glad you’re there, while flying on a US airline makes me feel like I am a nuisance to the flight attendants and other airline staff. And I’m nice. I smile and say thank you.